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My new group of students are – shall we say, challenging. When I saw the group I was working with, I thought twice about my planned project. When I did, I decided to approach it in a different way. Instead of saying, “This is what you are going to do,” I said, “I think we should cheat on the social studies project.” Their response was immediate – they were actually paying attention!

Every year the 7th graders have to make and present a project about an assigned memorial or museum in Washington DC. Some of the students don’t get to go on the field trip to DC, so they get very resentful about doing a project on the subject. Often, they fail the 9 weeks because of their refusal to do the exploration project that is to be completed at home. So, I decided that this would be my inquiry project. I would give them the tools, they would research and make the project in collaboration.

I gave them examples of different applications on the iPad, different web tools, and examples of ways to present. They have been going fool tilt ever since. They have found ways to use the tools that I did not know existed, of course, so I am learning from them. Yeah!

Technology:

iPad – PuppetPals HD comic life, Popplet, Kromath3

Computer:

Popplet, Moviemaker

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Hello Cory,

There have definitely been times when I need a picture or two to illustrate a point when I write a blog post. And this is one of those times…

But where do I go to find one?

This photo, "Scratched red question mark" is copyright (c) unknown by takomabibelot and made available under a Attribution license

Personally I like to look for images on the Creative Commons area on Flickr. But first, what is Creative Commons? In a nutshell it is a non-profit organization started by this guy (Larry Lessig):

Here is a video called “Shared Culture” that explains the concept of Creative Commons:

A Shared Culture

Creative Commons License

A Shared Culture by Jesse Dylan is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike (CC BY-NC-SA) license.

So why would arts teachers want to know about Creative Commons? In an age where it is easy to “grab” a picture for a blog post, it is important to know who owns the rights to the image. Creative Commons licenses allow the owner of an image or other media artifact to share under with all of us under certain specifications. See FAQ for other Creative Commons questions. For more information on Creative Commons licenses, go here. As you can see on the Creative Commons area on Flickr, you can search for images based on the different types of attribution licenses.

Of course every arts educator is concerned with teaching students how to properly cite media on blogs and wikis. This is one resource that is good for every arts teacher to use and model for his/her students: http://librarianbyday.net/2009/09/28/how-to-attribute-a-creative-commons-photo-from-flickr/ See example 5 for a citing all the information for the image that you use from the Creative Commons area on Flickr. Here is an example of an image that I researched and cited:

This photo, "Scratched red question mark" is copyright (c) unknown by takomabibelot and made available under a Attribution license

So I am looking for an image online…. My rule of thumb is that If I don’t know who owns the rights to an image online or it is unclear whether or not it is Copyrighted, then I don’t use it. The Creative Commons area on Flickr provides one place where creators of images don’t mind sharing as long as we follow the guidelines for attributions for their work. ; )

Another area for finding other media such as videos and music is in the search area on Creative Commons. There are many items for use in blogs (providing that appropriate attribution information is included.

I hope that arts teachers will teach students this skill and talk with students about the ethics of researching and posting pictures with appropriate citations. This is part of teaching digital media literacy research skills. This also goes with the territory when pictures are posted on a blog. Otherwise students (and teachers) may have to spend years responding to emails from media owners saying, “please remove my copyrighted image from your site” or worse yet respond to threats of legal action.

Hope to see you in Creative Commons land!

Check out Kathy’s  guide to Everything! I’ve copied the page relating to iPads in the classroom, but she really has everything you could possibly need to get started on anything here.

http://www.schrockguide.net/ipads-in-the-classroom.html

During our morning session we were able to share the lessons we were doing with our classes.  Amanda showed an example of stop motion photography and also a video of gumby that she was able to share with her students.  She talked about how her students were taking ownerhip of their work, and using inquiry to discuss their projects with other stuents.  I was inspired to see the passion she was feeling for this lesson.  I took that she had a hard time letting go of the “Power” of being a teacher, but had a wonderful experience because of this.  I believe that this is what AE2.0 is doing for our group.  It is giving us the freedom to explore different ways of reaching our students.

I was able to share a video after lunch with the group that I made with my student teachers. It was a good example of how inquiry was used in drawing faces in my art II class.  It showed how the questioning might be a little different than direct instruction, and was also able to show how the students interactions were different during the lesson.  Carol was able to see what I was talking about rather than just having me tell her and not giving examples.

During the afternoon, we were all able to interact and ask questions specific to technology and anything we may have had an issue with.  IT was a good time for everyone to be able to just relax and gather information regarding the blog and other things we might need help with.

So Cory… I have been reading all the blog posts and thought it might be helpful if we shared the process of following other teacher’s posts… So that others can comment and collaborate where they feel appropriate on each other’s blog posts?

I have found it useful to receive email updates when anyone from the blog makes new posts. Below is a screenshot if you are not already receiving these updates. Do you find this a useful tool Cory?:

I wanted to share with my fellow AE these 2 videos made by a group of students in Art 1. These are the responses of this particular group to the inquiry question; How can we re-tell the story of our school?

I would appreciate your feedback, especially any help with editing out the sound noise on the final rap video.

 

Preview of Sunshine video:

http://vimeo.com/33917005

 

THE Sunshine Video:

http://vimeo.com/33917437

 

 

 

Cory, perhaps we can provide some tech support here?

I have been thinking about the participant’s process of including categories and tags in their posts. Perhaps it would be helpful for us to share some more specifics about this process?

After reading each of the quotes, it took me a while to decide which quote it was that I wanted to respond to…  finally, I rested on quote #5…

The question is “In what ways might inquiry disrupt the traditional idea of teacher as expert and learner as novice?”

When I consider the changes in education over the past 20 years (12yrs teaching, 4yrs teacher training, 4yrs my own HS career),  it is clear that the entire educational system has experienced a dramatic shift.  Now this shift was dramatic for me, because I was personally involved, but I am certain that during the decade before people in my position can say the same thing, and I am certain that a decade from now the same will be said again.  It seems that change is a constant – which is not always good and not always bad.  Right now I am confused by what the “traditional idea” of a teacher is.  I will comment that inquiry challenges a traditional thought where noise is bad, students should stay in their seats, and notes should be quietly taken.  I also believe that inquiry based activities provide students with the opportunity to explore that it is ok to not be perfect, a chance to explore their resources and to find creative answers to problems.

The relationship between me and this quote is that I question “traditional” thought when it comes to technology and availability of information.  I think that there are many activities that I could offer students if they were allowed to use their phones, mp3 players, etc. in my class.  In this time of the availability of  information, I feel like my phone, or other mobile technology could help me provide students with new and changing information, as well as, the tools for students to discover this information on their own.

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